About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
think it's important that we have a seat at the table. >> flash point serious, secretary clinton in brussels where nato leaders are sending patriot anti-defense missiles to turkey and warning syria of any thought of using chemical weapons. prince william leaves the hospital after visiting kate. she remains hospitalized for severe morning sickness. good day. i'm amount li-- andrea mitchell live in washington. the senate has managed to vote on something, rejected a u.n. treaty to extend rights to the blind and disabled, rights that have been the law of the land here in the united states since 1990. despite an emotional appearance from bob dole just out of walter reed, 89 years old, a passionate advocate for equal rights for the disabled since his first speech on the senate floor in 1969. joining me for our daily fix, kra, managing editor of post politics.com and capitol hill correspondents, nbc's kelly o'donnell and luke russert. kelly, to you, because this vote in the senate, john kerry led the way, it was bipartisan, in support. they needed 6 votes. it's a treaty, two-thirds of t
forgets that president clinton raised taxes on the wealthy and created 22 million jobs. president bush cut taxes on the wealthy and created 1 million jobs. so his economic expertise is a little behind here. but the truth of the matter is, everybody voted in this election, the president said he would raise taxes on people earning over $250,000. that's what he's going to do. that's what's going to happen. he has the authority of an election behind him. running for office is a difficult thing to do, and the people that win the elections have a lot more moral authority than in a democracy than people who talk about elections. >> ryan, that does seem to be the point. republicans may not like it, but that wasn't what this election said american people want. the majority of them. >> i think it's certainly true you have a large number of americans, 60%, according to a "washington post" abc news poll who favor raising taxes on folks earning more than $250,000 a year. but there are a couple other things to keep in mind, as well. president obama often talks about returning to clinton era tax rates.
this because you remember, we went through this with newt. you know, bill clinton would push newt only so far, and then the conservatives in the caucus like myself and matt salmon, steve largent and others would say we're not doing a deal. we will take this place down. we're not doing a deal. and then newt would call bill clinton up and say, you're pushing me too far. you've got to work with me here. the same thing's happening right now with boehner. >> with boehner. >> the republican -- and when you start stripping people of committee -- committee seats, war breaks out and it gets really -- it happened with us. it's about to happen here. he's got to realize that boehner is his partner. >> it feels like we're at a really critical moment here with respect to boehner. and he can choose one of two paths. he could choose the recalcitrant path, which is perfectly possible, or he can say to himself, okay, i need to build a coalition for the purposes of this fiscal cliff deal. that includes house democrats. and how do i go about doing that without totally alienating the base of my party? and i'm ver
to work, does it? but in the clinton era when the rates went up, the 39.6 from 35 , they paid a little bit more and, guess what, the income boomed. we had 3.8% unploimed. we balanced the budget -- we had 3.8% unemployment. we balanced the budget. they opposed the tax increases in 4-. they said a disaster would result. not a single republican voted for the increases in taxes that president clinton put forward, which ultimately led to a balanced budget and paying down debt for the first time in 50 years. not one of them because they said it would bring economic disaster and instead is brought prosperity. so they brought out that old broken record, they glued it back together. maybe they put it on the -- put it in a digital format or something. but they're playing it again. it's as valid now as it was then. so it's the same old plan, stick it to the middle class, stick it to the seniors and benefit the ultrawealthy in this country. that's not a new plan. that's the same old broken record. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. po
representative cole if we restore the clinton tax rates today than in ten years, 2022, we have the deficit where it should be. >> guest: he is certainly correct to generate a great deal more revenue. if we did that let's say they made for under $50,000 that is a 2,000-dollar tax increase and again i don't think the president wants to do that. he said he doesn't want to do that our side doesn't want to do that. you know, going back to the clinton tax rate, and remember the average american family has taken a terrific hit. the median household income for years ago when the president became the president was around $54,000 a year and is about 50 now. so this portion of the population which is gotten squeezed tremendously i don't think adding an extra tax at the 98 percent is going to, number one, be very helpful to the more helpful to the economic growth. number two it's how much you want the folks to pay? so again, freezing those tax rates with an overwhelming majority of americans is a smart thing to do, we ought to do it and both sides say they want to. >> host: and you said earlier on -- >> gue
the first clinton budget back in 1993. while raising taxes on the wealthy is justified and necessary, it's just the first step in a long journey toward the future. one that requires not just the wealthy pay more in taxes. two strange facts in comparison to other democracies. we are taxed ranking 30th. we also have, at least on the books, one of the most progressive tax codes. in terms of the distance from the official rates, those at the top and the bottom pay. of course, what is system produced is some of the worst inequality in the world. underfunding in infrastructure. the solution to this problem in the long run and the solution to an ageing population where health care will consume a greater part of the economy is for everyone to pay more in taxes and guarantee a form of public goods. the most successful democracy is where it is structured around universe albens where everyone pays in and makes use of what the state provides. now, no leaders are making that argument. in the short run, they are right not to. getting rid of the entirety of the bush tax cuts for all brackets hurts the
that. our side doesn't want to do that. going back to the clinton tax rate, the wealth of the average american families taking a terrific head meetinghouse clothing come four years ago when the president was about to do $4000 a year. this portion which is most of us has gotten squeezed preacher meant to say. i don't think adding extra taxes on 90% will number one be very helpful to them for helpful to the economic growth and number two, how much do you want folks to bear? again, freezing those tax rates for the overwhelming majority of americans is a smart thing to do. both sides say they want to. the fight was start the next day. i think we could do what i'm talking about the negotiations underway right now could continue and they should. again, doing what i'm talking about doesn't violate what either side is fighting over. they both say this is something we want to do. again, make sure we don't have some last-minute failure at the end of december. >> host: what gives you confidence democrats up later on agreed to extending tax cuts for the wealthiest americans? >> guest: this is whe
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)